Photo 18 Apr 42,497 notes transfeminism:

OK, so I kind of liked this analogy, until I came across the following use of a similar analogy in The New York State Reporter, a book of New York State court decisions published in 1894.

At common law, if a person intended to steal an article take it with the the owner’s consent, it is not larceny. … In such a case the completed act, accomplished as intended, not being a crime, none of the steps taken being ingredients of the offense, would constitute a crime, and the taker could not be convicted of an attempt to commit the crime of larceny.
If an assault should be made on a man dressed as a woman with the intent to ravish, the assailant believing the person assaulted to be a woman, he could not be convicted of an attempt to ravish, because in such a case the commission of the crime of rape would be an impossibility. So in the case at bar, it was a legal impossibility to commit the crime of extortion as against the woman Ames, because she inveigled the defendant to commit the act and was not in fear by him. [Emphasis added.]

In the case of The People v. Gardiner, Catherine Ames, who ran a “house of prostitution,” was coerced by Charles W. Gardiner, who threatened to have her prosecuted, to pay him $150. The court ruled that it was a “legal impossibility” for Gardiner to extorted money from Ames, claiming that she was not in fear.
While not exactly the same as the “mugging” dialog above, the two cases have significant parallels. Both coerce someone to give the other person their money, main difference is the one uses the threat of a gun and the other uses the threat of criminal prosecution. While the hypothetical mugging is used as a rape analogy, in the real life case of The People v. Gardiner the court itself makes an analogy to rape.
Only in real life case, the attempted rape of a trans woman or male cross-dresser is actually deemed an “impossibility,” and is not recognized by the court as a crime. Moreover, in a clear case of “victim-blaming,” it is suggested that trans women and cross-dresser actually “inveigled” their assailants to attack them.
While this may be a case from the nineteenth century, this view of the “impossibility” of rape of trans women is still predominant in our society.

transfeminism:

OK, so I kind of liked this analogy, until I came across the following use of a similar analogy in The New York State Reporter, a book of New York State court decisions published in 1894.

At common law, if a person intended to steal an article take it with the the owner’s consent, it is not larceny. … In such a case the completed act, accomplished as intended, not being a crime, none of the steps taken being ingredients of the offense, would constitute a crime, and the taker could not be convicted of an attempt to commit the crime of larceny.

If an assault should be made on a man dressed as a woman with the intent to ravish, the assailant believing the person assaulted to be a woman, he could not be convicted of an attempt to ravish, because in such a case the commission of the crime of rape would be an impossibility. So in the case at bar, it was a legal impossibility to commit the crime of extortion as against the woman Ames, because she inveigled the defendant to commit the act and was not in fear by him. [Emphasis added.]

In the case of The People v. Gardiner, Catherine Ames, who ran a “house of prostitution,” was coerced by Charles W. Gardiner, who threatened to have her prosecuted, to pay him $150. The court ruled that it was a “legal impossibility” for Gardiner to extorted money from Ames, claiming that she was not in fear.

While not exactly the same as the “mugging” dialog above, the two cases have significant parallels. Both coerce someone to give the other person their money, main difference is the one uses the threat of a gun and the other uses the threat of criminal prosecution. While the hypothetical mugging is used as a rape analogy, in the real life case of The People v. Gardiner the court itself makes an analogy to rape.

Only in real life case, the attempted rape of a trans woman or male cross-dresser is actually deemed an “impossibility,” and is not recognized by the court as a crime. Moreover, in a clear case of “victim-blaming,” it is suggested that trans women and cross-dresser actually “inveigled” their assailants to attack them.

While this may be a case from the nineteenth century, this view of the “impossibility” of rape of trans women is still predominant in our society.

Photo 18 Apr 74,484 notes
Photo 18 Apr 1,818 notes tomtrager:

Time Lord Magazine. If you liked this issue go back in time and write it. 
AVAILABLE AS A TEE AT:
http://www.redbubble.com/people/tomtrager/works/8240827-time-lord-magazine
Link 18 Apr 242 notes Michael "Flathead" Blanchard Obituary: Denver Post»

meggsie:

npr:

Would have loved to meet him. — Tanya

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Michael “Flathead” Blanchard

A Celebration of the life of Michael “Flathead” Blanchard will be held on April 14th, 3 pm 8160 Rosemary St, Commerce City.

Weary of reading obituaries noting someone’s courageous battle with death, Mike wanted it known that he died as a result of being stubborn, refusing to follow doctors’ orders and raising hell for more than six decades. He enjoyed booze, guns, cars and younger women until the day he died.

Mike was born July 1944 in Colorado to Clyde and Ethel Blanchard. A community activist, he is noted for saving the Dr. Justina Ford house from demolition and defending those who could not defend themselves. He was a Republican delegate, life member of the NRA, founder and President of the Dead Cats MC. He loved music.

Mike was preceded in death by Clyde and Ethel Blanchard, survived by his beloved sons Mike and Chopper, former wife Jane Transue, brother Stephen Blanchard (Susan), Uncle Don and Aunt Cynthia Blanchard(his favorite); Uncle Dill and Aunt Dot, cousins and nephews, Baba Yaga can kiss his butt. So many of his childhood friends that weren’t killed in Vietnam went on to become criminals, prostitutes and/or Democrats. He asks that you stop by and re-tell the stories he can no longer tell. As the Celebration will contain Adult material we respectfully ask that no children under 18 attend. Published in the Denver Post on April 12,2012

I think I would have very much liked this guy!

via Untitled.
Photo 18 Apr 124 notes jimkeenan:

bijan:

Earlier today I saw this interesting tweet from Chris Dixon.
Google is trying their hardest to make a dent in the social universe by creating, or buying or cloning these days.
So this tweet can make you think how different things at google might have been if they were able to keep these folks at the company like they did with Android for example.
But this isn’t how Silicon Valley works and the world is better for it. Those founders learned some valuable skills at google and built some life long relationships (ev worked with @goldman and @biz at google and it’s no secret that there are a fair number of former google engineers at foursquare).
And because california (unlike MA, NY and others) doesnt allow the use of employee non competes the world gets Twitter, Foursquare and Instagram.
That is a very good thing and we should celebrate it.
Having people leave your company isn’t always a bad thing. Even for the company being left behind. More innovation makes everyone better.
(please excuse typos and lack of links. wrote this on my phone)

I liked this, it says a lot.

jimkeenan:

bijan:

Earlier today I saw this interesting tweet from Chris Dixon.

Google is trying their hardest to make a dent in the social universe by creating, or buying or cloning these days.

So this tweet can make you think how different things at google might have been if they were able to keep these folks at the company like they did with Android for example.

But this isn’t how Silicon Valley works and the world is better for it. Those founders learned some valuable skills at google and built some life long relationships (ev worked with @goldman and @biz at google and it’s no secret that there are a fair number of former google engineers at foursquare).

And because california (unlike MA, NY and others) doesnt allow the use of employee non competes the world gets Twitter, Foursquare and Instagram.

That is a very good thing and we should celebrate it.

Having people leave your company isn’t always a bad thing. Even for the company being left behind. More innovation makes everyone better.

(please excuse typos and lack of links. wrote this on my phone)

I liked this, it says a lot.

via Keenan.
Photo 18 Apr 92 notes y0uknownothing:

Okay I liked this one better. Have my boobs.  

y0uknownothing:

Okay I liked this one better. 
Have my boobs.  

Video 17 Apr 56,403 notes

cassjaytuck:

ageoffoolishnessyeah:

I really liked this movie. 

I love these books, and I love this movie.

(Source: rickgrimeshappens)

Photo 17 Apr 1,936 notes
via Δ S > 0.
Link 17 Apr 5,976 notes Pixel Politics: Pixel Politics is BACK!»

pixelpolitics:

…with a surprise!

Do your Wednesdays feel joyless and empty now Parliament’s in its summer recess? Does 12 o’clock pass without event, leaving you deflated and depressed?

Prime Minister’s Questions is every political nut’s favourite time of the week and we all deserve to enjoy it whenever we…

Photo 17 Apr 390 notes finchdown:

You all liked this picture so much, you can see all the outtakes right hurr, on the @GodsGirls journal I just posted.  
They’re pretty hot.  I don’t really say that lightly.  They even turn me on a little.  

finchdown:

You all liked this picture so much, you can see all the outtakes right hurr, on the @GodsGirls journal I just posted.  

They’re pretty hot.  I don’t really say that lightly.  They even turn me on a little.  

(Source: Flickr / only_taciturn)


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